The Prostate

Can Sex Prevent Prostate Cancer?

Whether or not sex is good for prostate problems is a question many men wonder, and it’s an important one that needs answering.

The prostate plays an active role during sexual activity.

It is responsible for making fluid in semen, which helps transport your sperm when you ejaculate.

The effect regular ejaculations have on the prostate should become a significant talking point, especially amongst men who are experiencing prostate problems.

This article will determine whether a healthy sex life can reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer.

Does sexual activity improve prostate health?

Experts suggest that in addition to clearing toxins through ejaculation, sex may also reduce the development of tiny crystals that are associated with some cancers.

Regular ejaculation enhances the immune system’s response to the presence of cancer cells.

According to a report published in JAMA, men who reported having more than 20 ejaculations per month were 33% less likely to develop prostate cancer.

These measured ejaculations included sexual intercourse, nocturnal emissions, and masturbation. Researchers evaluated nearly 30,000 patients, of whom 1,449 developed prostate cancer.

Assuming the men answered the survey questions honestly, the results indicated that an active sex life is not associated with higher cancer risk in most men.

An Australian study of 2,338 men also came to a similar conclusion. This study found that men who averaged 4.6 to seven ejaculations a week were 36% less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer before the age of 70 compared to men who ejaculated less than 2.3 times a week on average.

The study found no connection between prostate cancer and the number of sex partners.

Prostate Cancer and Sexual Health

A prostate cancer diagnosis can leave you feeling anxious, frustrated, and depressed.

It may also leave you wondering about your ability to have sex. You may also be questioning how prostate cancer treatment can affect your sex life.

Prostate cancer rarely causes problems with sex, but the treatments for prostate cancer often affect penile function and reproduction.

Prostate surgery and radiation are the two most common treatments for prostate cancer. Both of these can affect the nerves in your penis and could cause sexual problems like erectile dysfunction (ED).

Cryotherapy and ultrasound therapy can also cause ED. Your doctor may recommend hormone therapy or radiation therapy, as well. This therapy can lower your sex drive.

Radical prostatectomy is the most effective nerve-sparing surgery for prostate cancer. It can substantially limit the duration of post-surgical ED but requires a surgeon to be highly skilled and trained in the process.

In this type of procedure, the surgeon takes care not to damage the erectile nerves that surround the prostate as it is removed.

However, if cancer has infiltrated these nerves, it may not be possible to save them.

Preventing injury to these nerves dramatically improves the chances of a man recovering erectile function within two years of the surgery.

In addition to ED, you may also find that your orgasms are different after undergoing treatment for prostate cancer.

They may not feel as strong, and you will not see as much ejaculate. As a result, you may also be unable to father children naturally because of the lack of semen produced by the prostate.

You will still be able to ejaculate, but they will be “dry.” If you want to have children later in life, you can use a sperm bank to store your sperm until you and your partner are ready to conceive.


For more information on prostate cancer click here.


Natural Remedies

Several studies have also shown natural supplements to offer a natural and safe way to help treat ED without the need for medical intervention and side effects.

For example, Ben’s Testo-Booster contains a herb that has been proven to help increase the body’s testosterone levels and help to produce stronger erections naturally.

As good blood flow is essential to getting and maintaining an erection. Taking a 100% natural and organic treatment can make capillaries open and blood flow easier. Ben’s Organic Concentrated Garlic Extract, can help treat ED effectively and safely.

With no side effects to note for any of these natural supplements, they are an option to be strongly considered when looking for a treatment for erection problems.


For more information on prostate supplements click here.


Conclusion

Sex after prostate cancer might not seem possible, but it is. It is important to be patient with yourself and understand that your body is going through a lot. Once treatments have been completed, take your time getting back into sex.

So to answer the question is sex good for your men’s health, the answer appears to be yes. In later life, regular sexual activity seems to have a positive effect on the prostate and prostate health.

Overall, regular safe sexual activity seems to be healthy for the prostate and have benefits for a range of prostate problems.

Some prostatitis symptoms can be relieved by frequent sexual activity and, in older men, regular ejaculation has protective effects against prostate cancer.  A higher frequency of ejaculation is associated with a decreased risk of developing prostate cancer.

Sources

  1. Dimitropoulou P., et al. 2009. Sexual activity and prostate cancer risk in men diagnosed at a younger age. BJU Int. Jan;103(2): pp. 178-185.
  2. Emanu JC, Avildsen IK, Nelson CJ. Erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: prevalence, medical treatments, and psychosocial interventions. Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2016;10(1):102–107. doi:10.1097/SPC.0000000000000195
  3. Grondhuis Palacios LA, Krouwel EM, den Oudsten BL, et al. Suitable sexual health care according to men with prostate cancer and their partners. Support Care Cancer. 2018;26(12):4169–4176. doi:10.1007/s00520-018-4290-2
  4. Haahr MK, Azawi NH, Andersen LG, Carlson S, Lund L. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids in Prostate Cancer Patients After Radical Prostatectomy in Denmark. Sex Med. 2017;5(3):e156–e162. doi:10.1016/j.esxm.2017.06.003
  5. Kiguradze T, Temps WH, Yarnold PR, et al. Persistent erectile dysfunction in men exposed to the 5α-reductase inhibitors, finasteride, or dutasteride. PeerJ. 2017;5:e3020. Published 2017 Mar 9. doi:10.7717/peerj.3020
  6. Koskimäki et al. Regular Intercourse Protects Against Erectile Dysfunction: Tampere Aging Male Urologic Study. The American Journal of Medicine, 2008; 121 (7): 592 DOI: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2008.02.042
  7. Leitzmann MF, Platz EA, Stampfer MJ, et al. 2004. Ejaculation Frequency and Subsequent Risk of Prostate Cancer. Journal of the American Medical Association 291: pp. 1578-1586. PMID: 15069045.
  8. Lin WY, Chang YH, Lin CL, Kao CH, Wu HC. Erectile dysfunction and the risk of prostate cancer. Oncotarget. 2017;8(32):52690–52698. Published 2017 Apr 13. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.17082

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  1. Breann Vranich

    Great line up. We will be linking to this great article on our site. Keep up the good writing.

    • Ben's Natural Health Team

      Hi Breann, thank you for your feedback,it is much appreciated. Would you mind telling us the name of your site? Wishing you good health, The Ben’s Natural Health Team.

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